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Album Review: At The Gates - To Drink From The Night Itself

June 12, 2018

 

Artist: At The Gates

Album: To Drink From The Night Itself

Genre: Melodic Death Metal

Released: 18 May 2018

Review by Sam Radojcin

 

Four years since their titanic reunion album - 2004's At War With Reality accompanied by relentless touring around the globe, Swedish melodic death metal godfathers At The Gates reconvened to create the long awaited follow up, their sixth studio album entitled To Drink From The Night Itself.

 

As the orchestral / piano & choral introduction "Der Widerstand" begins, you get a somewhat dark and ominous feeling that builds up the anticipation, right to be hit with the sonic wallop of the title track "To Drink From The Night Itself" bolstered by tight chugging riffs, pounding drums and Tomas Lindberg weaving and projecting his unique vocal rasp right over the top of it all.

 

In cuts such as "The Chasm", the anthemic "In Death They Shall Burn", "In Nameless Sleep" and the epic "Seas Of Starvation", At The Gates’ classic and well known formula is in full flight here and that will surely appease the oldest of fans, "Palace Of Lepers" brings a good helping of mid tempo groove, as well as "A Stare Bound In Stone" with it’s slight stoner / doom feel, the almost cinematic "Daggers Of Black Haze" derives from a moody and brooding feeling, "The Colours Of The Beast" heads into somewhat of a blackened metal territory whereas "A Labyrinth Of Tombs" and "The Mirror Black" lean towards being somewhat more atmospheric and vivid while still retaining the darkened feel and heaviness established throughout.

 

 

Compared to At War With Reality, the production emanates from a bit more of a raw standpoint that is more reminiscent of the band’s earlier formative days but still possesses an abundance of punch, grit and attack found in modern releases, a perfect example is how Jonas Bjorler’s bass tone just cuts through prominently and strengthens through the wall of guitar and drums without getting lost in the shuffle.

 

Throughout the duration of To Drink From The Night Itself, At The Gates take you on a dark and melancholy journey that switches gears often resulting in different dynamics and themes thrown around, yet still maintains the solid heavy foundation that you know and expect from At The Gates.

 

9.5 out of 10.

 

To Drink From The Night Itself is out now via Century Media Records.

 

 

 

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