Album Review: ENTER SHIKARI - Nothing Is True & Everything Is Possible



Artist: Enter Shikari

Album: Nothing Is True & Everything Is Possible

Genre: Art Pop / Electronic Rock / Dance Rock / Grime / Trance / House / Synth Pop / Experimental Rock / Electro Pop / Indie Rock

Review by: Karl O’Shea


Very few bands can evolve their sound without either completely jumping the shark or losing their “X Factor” that music listeners gravitate towards in the first place. Experimenting with a tried-and-true formula can present a tonne of hurdles musically, let alone the risk presented by losing a core fanbase. Enter Shikari has been unique in side-stepping a lot of these issues as even as far back as their debut album, there’s always been a restless musical spirit that drives the four piece forward. Although their sound has always been a fusion of different styles of rock and electronica, they’ve never rested on their laurels creating a strong catalogue of forward-thinking music that constantly succeeds and surprises.


Nothing Is True… continues this trend, evolving from the sparkling pop and post-punk of The Spark to create an album that is somehow a cross-section of their entire career whilst also looking forward. This is both the Enter Shikari fans know and love but also an Enter Shikari that has well and truly embraced artful experimentation, anthemic pop hooks and layers upon layers of textures. It’s both a “crank the stereo” album and a headphone album. It’s really bloody good.


First things first - if you’re craving the metal riffage and hardcore breakdowns of the past then you’re probably gonna have some complaints. The truly best way to hear this record is to leave your expectations at the door and dive in for the full 43-minutes-and-change, ideally with a good set of headphones to get lost in the glistening production on display. This is the best the band has ever sounded and every track is a layer cake of textures from a plethora of sources. It’s widescreen, technicolour pop music that borrows it’s adventurous spirit from 80s art-pop and new wave. They’ve thrown in everything including the kitchen sink and have somehow avoided creating an unlistenable mess.


There are familiar Shikari tropes on display with lead singles like “the king” and “{ The Dreamer’s Hotel }” erring closer to albums past without being mere retreads. There’s still the highly politically-charged lyrics that veer from the satirical to the scathinginly critical. But then there are tracks on here that tackle styles that the band has either only briefly flirted with before or never even attempted. “Crossing The Rubicon” is unabashed eighties indie pop with stadium-sized hooks; “Waltzing Off The Face Of The Earth” (I. Crescendo)” is a brass-led waltz that descends into noise until it regains its composure at the end; and the biggest departure “Elegy For Extinction” is an instrumental and cinematic sounding orchestral piece that weirdly sounds like it could come from a Disney film. Variety is the name of the game and Nothing Is True...has that in spades.


Enter Shikari truly embody the punk spirit even if they don’t quite sound like traditional punk music. It’s evident in their social consciousness, in their DIY attitude towards being a band and the fact that they truly do not give a shit about what they should sound like. These qualities have helped shape an addictive and bold album brimming with ideas that should rightly be seen as one of the great rock (or whatever this is) albums of 2020.


Nothing Is True & Everything Is Possible is out 17th April via So Recordings.



Purchase and stream the new album here: https://orcd.co/nothingistrue


NOTHING IS TRUE & EVERYTHING IS POSSIBLE TRACK LISTING:


01. The Great Unknown

02. Crossing The Rubicon

03. { The Dreamer's Hotel }

04. Waltzing off the Face of the Earth (I. Crescendo)

05. modern living…

06. apocoholics anonymous (main theme in B minor)

07. the pressure’s on

08. Reprise 3

09. T.I.N.A

10. Elegy For Extinction

11. Marionettes (I. The Discovery of Strings)

12. Marionettes (II. The Ascent)

13. satellites

14. the king

15. Waltzing off the Face of the Earth (II. Piangevole)




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